Keylime Toolbox Blog: Fresh SEO Advice

By April 22, 2016 0

Dear Foot Locker, We all know the brick and mortar sales business is tough these days. Everyone is shopping online. Nobody’s going to the mall anymore. But you’ve got a few tricks up your sleeve. Sometimes we want to see the shoes in person, try them on. And we can’t talk to an expert when we’re shopping on a web site. Foot Locker, when a potential customer walks through that door, you’ve got a prime opportunity to win them over with knowledge and keep them coming back. Your business is shoes. Shouldn’t you know more about them than your customers? Yet, consider the Under Armour Curry 1 Camp Mid. You know, that shoe that you rank #3 in Google for? You don’t stock this shoe. So maybe you don’t care about someone asking about it. Except perhaps you should. Customer lifetime value and all of that. Dazzle the customer with your expertise and service. Read more ...

By April 5, 2016 0

Over 1 million queries a month? Well, OK, your site has to get Google organic traffic traffic from  more than a million queries a month in order for Keylime Toolbox to recover that much data, but no matter how much traffic your site gets, Keylime Toolbox can help recover a lot of that “not provided” data for better insight into your site’s SEO performance and your audience’s needs. Keylime Toolbox maximizes the data available from Google’s API (using API filters), recovers even more data by aggregating and deduplicating query data from subfolders, and adds any unique queries provided by Google Analytics. Keylime Toolbox stores and tracks all available query data. On average, Keylime Toolbox imports nearly 17,000 queries for each site each day, but the actual number of queries available varies based on the site size, how much long tail traffic the site gets, and how many subfolders have been added Read more ...

By March 26, 2016 1

opentable.com ranks #1 for Google organic desktop searches for [moda center courtside club reservations]. SEO accomplished? Maybe not. Huh. The mobile page ranks and not the desktop page. Maybe technical SEO best practices haven’t been implemented for the mobile pages. Well, the mobile page does have a canonical attribute pointing to the desktop page. Is Google just ignoring that? Well, yeah. But why? Is this a bug with Google’s indexing? Nope. The mobile page has a canonical attribute value of a desktop page that is blocked with a robots meta tag. If a URL has a canonical value of a page that is blocked with a robots meta tag or robots.txt or that doesn’t return a 200 response code, Google is likely to ignore that canonical directive. The desktop page also doesn’t follow other best practices of a rel alternate media attribute from the desktop page to the mobile page Read more ...

By November 3, 2015 0

Apparently all I do on the internet is stalk Josh Malina. Last time, I used his wife’s online store as an example of nothing above the fold. My latest internet irritation is the lack of related links in his Entertainment Weekly Scandal recap posts. Behold my most recent Friday night: Watch Scandal. Search for recaps on Scandal. Find Josh Malina and Scott Foley’s latest blog post. Want more! Can’t find more. Write this post. It all started out pretty promising. You’re probably starting to get the hint that if I see Josh Malina’s name, I’m clicking (the power of a brand in search results compelling a click): And I have to say, if you’re a Scandal fan, you really should be reading these weekly recaps from Josh Malina and Scott Foley. But here’s the problem. There’s no way to get from one recap to any of the others. Tons of Read more ...

By October 26, 2015 0

An unfortunate consequence of working with the web for so many years is that when I’m online, I can’t just enjoy the wonder and awe that is the internet. As I load the pages, my mind is a running commentary of “why?! why does it have to be this way?!” To keep the bitter resentment from building up until I shun the internet forever and make my way in the world carrying encyclopedias and the yellow pages in a backpack, I’m starting a new blog series to work out my internet traumas. Up first: the curious case of nothing above the fold. Nothing above the fold is the current hip internet trend, like the rounded buttons of yesteryear. The most common case is a huge image that overtakes the entire screen. Images are engaging! They’re beautiful! They’re worth a thousand words! And yes, all of those things are true. But just give Read more ...

By August 11, 2015 0

Last week, Google launched support for query data in their Google Search Console API. With this launch, we have access to data that wasn’t available before, which provides even more insight into how sites are performing in Google organic search and what audiences are searching for. We took part in the beta test of the new API and integrated it as soon as it launched. Here’s what we know so far: This API provides up to 5,000 results per request, which in some cases provides access to significantly more query data. (Side note: if you’re implementing the API and are finding that only 4,999 results are returned, try adding a filter to get the full 5,000. This quirk seems to be a minor glitch.) You can request filtered data (by adding a dimension like country or device or page), but unfortunately that ultimately reduces the number of results returned. (In other words, Read more ...

By June 28, 2015 0

Keylime Toolbox provides robust reporting about how your site performs in Google organic search by recovering “not provided” query data, segmenting queries into branded, non-branded, and topical categories, and charting SEO trends (such as ranking, impressions, and click through rate) over time. However, some of our customers use this data as part of larger internal reporting systems or analyze the data in ways other than are available within the Keylime Toolbox interface. Several types of data are available for offline use. API-Based Aggregated Query and URL Data + Crawl Analytics The Keylime Toolbox API provides programmatic access to three types of data as daily files: Aggregated query data from Google Search Console: Separate file for each reporting group, containing aggregated query data for all domains, subdomains, and subfolders in that group. Duplicate query data from subfolders is removed. Aggregated URL data from Google Search Console: Separate file for each reporting group, containing Read more ...

By June 2, 2015 9

Understanding your site’s click through rates — how many searchers click your site’s listing when seeing it in search results – can be key to SEO. But are web-wide or industry average click through rates useful? We analyzed 4,896,866 keywords from April 2015 to see what we could find out about branded vs. non-branded searches, industry differences, and averages vs. site-specific metrics. Bottom line? We found that averages, even when segmented by query type, didn’t provide much actionable data for a specific site. When we compared averages to site-specific data, we didn’t find much that was similar. However, we did find that average click through rates within a site tended to hold fairly steady, and so using actual averaged click through rates for your own site can be very useful for things like calculating market opportunity of new content investments, estimating impact of rankings changes, and pinpointing issues with the site’s listings on the Read more ...

By February 1, 2015 0

Oh, NBC. I am super happy that you’re like, “oh, it’s the future! People use this thing called “the internet” now. Maybe we should I dunno, broadcast stuff on that.” And it’s cool that you’re using the Super Bowl to promote your “TV Everywhere” campaign, which I’m assuming is at least in some way about getting that TV isn’t about the receiving device anymore and that the phrase “watching TV” is becoming a bit like “dialing a number”. Soon, only the oldies will know why we call it that and everyone else will just assume it’s some nonsensical phrase like “cut and dried” or “the stock market is a good way to save for retirement”. But here’s the thing. Before today’s future of TV Everywhere, we all started using using search engines to look for stuff. Especially stuff we wanted to do online. So it’s possible you skipped ahead a little. I’m Read more ...

By September 26, 2014 1

Google organic search traffic is pretty important for most sites, but it doesn’t exist in a vacuum. It’s useful to understand the context of other traffic sources to a site. What percentage of traffic is organic search vs. other sources? How much search traffic is coming from search engines other than Google? When traffic changes from Google organic search, does that change match other traffic sources, or is something happening with the site specifically in Google? It’s also valuable to better understand what your customers are looking for. One core feature of Keylime Toolbox is recovery of “not provided” query data and that enables Keylime to provide key insights such as: The distribution of branded vs. unbranded Google organic traffic The topic areas that drive the most traffic Average click through rates, ranking positions, and bounce rate for branded vs. unbranded traffic and for each topic area If traffic changes are Read more ...