Keylime Toolbox Blog: Fresh SEO Advice

By September 2, 2014 0

Keylime Toolbox recovers as much “not provided” query data as possible and turns that data into useful insights about your audience and your site’s performance in Google organic search. For instance: What percentage of your site’s traffic is branded? What topics are your audiences most interested in? How does ranking and click through rate differ for each segment? Are bounce rates higher for one segment vs. another? We found that in addition to tracking these metrics over time, as Keylime’s Query Analytics reports do, our customers also wanted to slice this data in lots of different ways in one-time reports. So, we’ve launched the custom segmentation tool, available to all Keylime complete, enterprise, and agency users. For details on how this works, it’s useful to provide a little background on how Keylime recovers query data and what the Query Analytics reports track. Keylime-Recovered “Not Provided” Query Data Google is no longer Read more ...

By June 15, 2014 4

We launched Keylime Toolbox this week and I’ve already been getting lots of questions about SEO metrics. What data is most valuable to truly understand how your site is performing in unpaid search and to improve that performance? I built Keylime Toolbox for exactly this purpose — to track the SEO metrics that matter most. My approach to success in search has always focused on the audience: what do they need and how well does your site meet those needs? Ultimately, all of the twists and turns and changes in Google’s algorithms are focused on finding and ranking pages that best answer searcher questions. Yet many commonly tracked SEO metrics just focus on the twists and turns of the algorithms. Tracking Searcher Needs and Searcher Happiness Tracking searcher needs and happiness can be pretty difficult and time consuming, especially in our current world of “not provided” query data (which can make the task impossible in some Read more ...

By June 10, 2014 3

Keylime Toolbox has launched! Check out our product tour, explore the demo account, or read on for details! We started with recovering “not provided” data, because knowing what your audiences are searching for and what your site is ranking for and how well you site engages visitors at the topic level is a super valuable foundation for all kinds of useful insights.         Keylime Toolbox pulls in Google Analytics and (aggregated, de-duplicated) Google Webmaster Tools data (for now; more data sources coming soon!) so you can track SEO performance starting at what the types into the search box, all the way through to the engagement on your site. Check out a few examples of the data Keylime Toolbox has uncovered: Site A has over 2 million Google organic visits a month and 97% of those visits are “not provided” Keylime Tools has reduced the not provided percentage Read more ...

By June 10, 2014 0

I don’t know everything. I don’t know how planes stay in the air or how to make flaky biscuits or whether we’ll be able to upload copies of ourselves to computers in our lifetimes. But I know a lot about search engine optimization. I didn’t initially set out to learn so much about search engines and how audiences and organizations connect through them. In college, I thought I’d end up as a newspaper reporter. Not like for the Huffington Post or something. For a news organization that printed stories on paper. We didn’t have HuffPo back then. Or the web. No one had any idea the internet would turn into anything like this. I didn’t become a newspaper reporter. I became a technical writer. These days, we think of “tech writers” as people who write for TechCrunch or Gizmodo. I wrote about point of sale systems for retail stores and network monitoring Read more ...

By April 29, 2014 0

The LA Clippers home page today looks like this: Because I am apparently a complete geek, my first thought was OMG WHAT IS THE TECHNICAL IMPLEMENTATION ARE THEY GOING TO DROP OUT OF GOOGLE’S INDEX?!! Ahem. But here’s the thing.  If the contents of the home page, in this case www.nba.com/clippers , was simply replaced with this new (temporary) content, then search engines would recrawl the URL, extract the content, and replace the earlier contents (with the regular home page stuff) with new content. That’s logical right? The result would be that anyone searching for regular Clippers basketball stuff, like merchandise or tickets or whatever, might not find the site because search engines would no longer have it indexed with that type of content. The Clippers don’t want that. And that’s what happened for a bunch of .gov sites when the government shut down last year. The pages of those Read more ...